Mission of the Month for November: TearFund

Tearfund’s mission continues, working with its partners world wide they are seriously involved in South Sudan, and the whole of East Africa where a shortage of food, has, according to the United Nations brought about a humanitarian crisis, the largest since the Second World War.

Unfortunately like all charity and mission funds they are overwhelmed with requests. The latest is from Myanmar, where Tearfund is in contact with COAST, supplying water, sanitation, food, shelter and medical aid for the thousands of refugees coming into Bangladesh.

However for every pound we give for the Christmas Appeal, up until the 31st December, the UK Government will match pound-for-pound.

So PLEASE PICK UP A LEAFLET AND PRAYER DIARY from the Mission Table in Church and use during NOVEMBER.

Many thanks,
Audrey Jefferies

For more information visit www.tearfund.org

Mission of the Month for October: Bible Society

For over 200 years Bible Society has been working to bring the Bible to life; to help people around the world engage with it, relate to it, and make sense of it.

For us, this means specifically the work of the Open The Book Team, led by the Revd Barbara Mapley, on behalf of Churches Together in Faringdon.  Every fortnight, as part of a carefully designed programme, the team acts out a Bible story for over 500 children in three performances.   We use a collection of Bible stories specially written for performance, with the full approval of OFSTED and SIAMS for presentation in schools across our multi-faith country.  Currently, there are over 2500 schools nationwide on the programme.

For the charity, the aim of the mission to bring the Bible to life drives a huge range of activities. In some parts of the world, bringing the Bible to life focuses on translation and distribution projects. Elsewhere it focuses on leadership training, or literacy programmes, or interfaith dialogue. Closer to home, in England and Wales, it focuses on advocacy effort, schools outreach and devotional resources.

The Bible Society is doing everything it can to help individuals and communities to engage with the Bible because we believe that when they do, lives can change – for good.

Peter Foot

Mission of the month for September – Scripture Union

How can they hear if nobody tells them?  (Romans 10:14)

Estimates suggest that 95% of children and young people in England and Wales don’t have regular contact with a church. Scripture Union believes that every child should have the opportunity to explore and respond to the good news of the Bible.

Scripture Union was established as a charity over 140 years ago and now works in more than 120 countries with children, young people and families. The purpose is to encourage people of all ages to meet God every day through the Bible and prayer, with the goal of helping people to grow in Christian maturity and become not only committed church members but also servants of a world in need.

Today in the UK they respond in innovative and exciting ways to encourage younger members of society to explore what a faith in Jesus might look like for them. For example, they organise a wide range of holidays throughout the school break and they estimate that this year over 1,400 children and young people will attend – they ask that we pray for them all, and the leaders and volunteers, that they will have fun in a safe environment and feel God’s presence.

Another example of the outreach in the coming months is the annual Light Party, an alternative to Hallowe’en celebrations. The light shines in the darkness and the darkness has not overcome it. (John 1:5)

The organisation also offers us suggestions about how to talk to children about Jesus: be yourself, keep it short, pray, stick to your theme, keep it simple and just do it!

We can support Scripture Union physically by holding activities or using any of their resources, financially through donations and prayerfully each day.

Kate Butcher

For more information visit www.scriptureunion.org.uk

Mission of the Month for August – Wycliffe Bible Translators

How the vision for Bible translation began

For more than 70 years Wycliffe has helped people around the world translate the Bible into their own languages. They also help with language development, literacy and other spiritual and physical needs.

In 1917 a missionary named William Cameron Townsend went to Guatemala to sell Spanish Bibles. He was shocked when many people couldn’t understand the books. They spoke Cakchiquel, a language without a Bible.

Townsend believed that everyone should understand the Bible, so he started a small linguistics school (the Summer Institute of Linguistics, known as SIL) that trained people to do Bible translation. The work continued to grow, and in 1942 he officially founded Wycliffe Bible Translators.

Over the following decades, Wycliffe celebrated many milestones – from the first translation in 1951, all the way to the 500th translation completed in 2000.

At the same time Wycliffe adopted a new challenge – a goal of starting a Bible translation project in every language still needing one by 2025.

In 1999 the leaders realized that at the speed they were going, it would be at least 2150 before a Bible translation could be started for every language that needed one.

As they thought about the people dying around the world every day without hearing the Good News of the Gospel, they felt God calling them to adopt a new goal for accomplishing this mission.

The leaders were committed that they should do everything they could to see a Bible translation program in progress in every language still needing one in 2025. They initially called this goal ‘Vision 2025’, although they later adopted the words as their mission statement.

Today, up to 1,800 languages are still waiting for a Bible translation to begin and Wycliffe is working faster than ever to reach those languages as soon as possible.

For more information please visit  Wycliffe’s excellent website www.wycliffe.org.uk.

 

Mission of the Month for July – INF

In 1953 two nurses, Betty Bailey and Eileen Lodge, started the first Leprosy hospital in Nepal. This was on the outskirts of Pokhara, a town of about 5,000 people 100 miles west of Kathmandu and one week’s walk away. An airfield, grazed by buffalo was nearby  and DC3s flew in daily depending on the weather. There was no electricity and water was carried up a 300ft cliff from the pipe below. They called the hospital ‘Green Pastures’.

There were one or two ‘leprosariums’ in Nepal where those with leprosy could find food and shelter but no medical treatment.

Betty celebrated her 90th birthday recently in Oxford. Someone asked her “How did you know what to do when you started?” “Oh” said Betty “We just did whatever needed to be done each day, and it just developed itself”. By which she meant, we built a few bamboo and thatched cottages – one for themselves included, got in firewood, food, and medicines and just welcomed whoever turned up.

And they did. Some walking for two, three or four weeks to get there, having heard there is hope in Pokhara. They could not go back to their villages from which they had been turned out. Leprosy was greatly feared, some believing that even if they saw someone with leprosy they might catch the disease. Green Pastures flourished with around 100 patients most of the time, with improved housing and kitchens, a hospital building, farming, vegetable growing, buffalos for milk and gas extracted from their dung for cooking.

A country wide Leprosy Control Programme was set up in the early 1970’s. The International Nepal Fellowship was responsible for three fifths of the country. The incidence of cases has dropped from 1 in 100 to 1 in 10,000 of the population, leading to fewer leprosy patients at Green Pastures. After years when no one would go to Green Pastures unless they had to for fear of catching leprosy, amazingly in 2016 an E.N.T. hospital was built on Green Pastures’ Land. It now sees 40 patients a day in out-patients and does up to 18 operations, mainly ears, weekly. They also treat spinal injuries and amputees, and  a prosthetic workshop and rehabilitation centre has been opened, to which people come from all over Nepal.

The book ‘Light dawns in Nepal’ shows a leprosy patient holding a Bible. Many became Christians in Green Pastures. The church in Nepal was indigenous from its beginnings in1952 and it has grown from less than a dozen to just about 1 million believers in 67 years. Because of persecutions Christians Nepalis are to be found in many countries of the world.

There was a time of special revival of the church in Nepal in 1966 and it started in ‘Green Pastures’.

Please look at the table in Church for more information. I can get more leaflets printed.

If you borrow the book ‘Light dawns in Nepal’ please could you return it to Margaret Scott-Brown.

Mission of the Month for April- African Children’s Fund

African Children’s Fund is a charity working to break down the barriers preventing African children leading happy and fulfilled lives.

Established in the Spring of 2006 by Dee & Peter Tyrer, we are a UK based charity and our projects are run by local staff who are committed to – and know the needs of – their own communities.

Africa’s children need an education if Africa is to prosper. These children yearn to learn. We can help fulfil that yearning – lifting them & their communities out of poverty.

The problems can be awful. The solutions are not rocket science. With your help and the children’s courage, education, opportunities and hope for the future can be achieved.

African Children’s Fund presently works Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Mission of the Month for February – INTERSERVE

Interserve is a non-denominational Christian missional community bringing the love of God and the good news about Jesus to the peoples of Asia & the Arab world wherever they are through word and action.

Currently we are working with other agencies to support Syrian refugees as they flee the fighting.

Since the Syrian Civil War began in March 2011 more than half of Syria’s 22 million people have been forced to leave their homes. More than 7 million have been displaced internally with another four million crossing into neighbouring countries.

Most of the refugees are now in Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Egypt. More than 507,000 have arrived in Europe — about 12 per cent of those seeking asylum.

These refugees have left everything behind. They live in vulnerable, cramped and insecure circumstances. They feel traumatised and unsafe. Many have faced resentment and encountered extremist views. This has only worsened their plight. They need people who know Jesus Christ as Lord, who speak their language and who can reach out to them with the gospel.

As Christians, we are called to minister to people’s needs not only physical, but also, more importantly, eternal. Let us, together use this horrific situation for good. God has provided us with a window of opportunity for the truth of the gospel to be shared and adopted by many.

Mission of the Month for January – WATSAN

 

Water is life. Sanitation is dignity.  WATSAN logo

Why I support Watsan.

Watsan’s source is dependable. The project started with Water Aid whose involvement moved on. Watsan picked up where Water Aid left off.

Watsan’s staff are all Ugandans, supervised by a Ugandan who trained in the U.K. It works under the umbrella of two Bishops, those of the diocese of Kiniiki and North Kigezi.

The U.K. Support Group provide back up if requested and financial support for things like concrete, etc. Mark Wickstead, a Watsan supporter, did a survey on sustainability, checking that all of the projects (2,500 springs, 12 gravity flow systems and 12 sanitation systems) are working as efficiently as possible.

Since clean water has been available other Non Governmental Organisations (for healthcare) have been able to set up, so healthcare messages can increasingly reach local people.

Watsan is run from Oxfordshire so we can bask in its reflected glory! It is our local overseas charity!

See also www.nkkdwatsan-uganda.com

Margaret Starr