George Abell writes … We look for the Resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come” (Exploring the Nicene Creed)

We look for the Resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come”
 (Exploring the Nicene Creed)

Christianity is like an ellipse that has two foci.  One focus is Jesus, our One Lord and Saviour, and the other focus is us (all humanity). These two foci of our holy faith are first, that Jesus took our human flesh, gave his life for us on the Cross, and on the third day rose again. And secondly that we also, because of his resurrection, will share a fully restored resurrection life at the end of our life’s journey.

But there is something very special about this “us” part of our Faith, because in Baptism, in a deeply spiritual yet real way, we actually receive and begin there and then, the precious gift of eternal life; the start of a born-again life-in-Christ (John3:1-17). At Holy Communion, when receiving the sacramental Body and Blood of Jesus, the minister will say words like this: ‘the Body of Christ keep you in eternal life’, and similarly with the sacrament of Christ’s Blood, shed for us.

This last statement of our creed is a kind of blanket declaration covering the entire Christian Hope for all humanity, that this life is not all there is, that death is not the final end; that the substance of our mortal human life and existence, body mind and spirit, individuality and personality, will be changed and transformed into a glorious, perfect, beautiful resurrection life. Our home then will not be a finite creation on a finite planet, but set in a world other than all we know now, the eternal world. There, in heaven, God the Holy Trinity is its direct life and light (Revelation 21:22-23). All this is almost beyond the scope of our present human knowing and imagination, so to help and assure us we have the most precious of all gifts from God, the gift of faith. That gift of faith has been given a solidity and firmness by Divine Revelation all through Old Testament Scripture, and supremely and finally in the New Testament of Christ’s life; in his very presence and teaching amongst us. And his disciples have encapsulated all this for us in the sacred writings; the distillation of all that they had come to believe through the words of Jesus himself and the prompting of his Holy Spirit. Here are key passages relevant for this part of our creed:

“You will show me the path of life; in your presence is the fullness of joy and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore” (Psalm 16:10; Old Testament). “The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, his compassion never fails” (Lamentations 3:22; O.T. again).

Jesus speaking to Martha after her brother’s death: “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die” (John 11:25-26). Jesus to all his disciples: “In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places…I go to prepare a place for you…I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be also” (John 14:2-3; see also 1 Corinthians 15:51-54 & 1 John 3:1-2).

St Peter, writing in 1 Peter 1:4-5: “The inheritance to which we are born [meaning Baptism] is one that nothing can destroy or spoil or wither. It is kept for you in heaven, and you, because you put your faith in God, are under the protection of his power”. Jesus again to the disciples: “This is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has give me, but raise it up on the last day…that all who see the Son and believe in him may have eternal life and I will raise them up on the last day” (John 6:39-40).

In earlier articles on the final Return of Jesus or “the last day” I tried to explain that the things of time and eternity intertwine and overlap as it were. So we have to hold in balance two different but related perceptions or consciousness of life here and now, and life still to come in the hereafter. We speak of our departed loved ones being now in heaven with Jesus; and in the Eternal Dimension that is certainly so. Viewed however from our present space-time world and dimension, the return of Jesus and the full resurrection life of our loved ones is still to come. Christians have long prayed for those who have died using words like this: “Rest eternal grant unto them O Lord, and let light perpetual shine upon them: may they rest in peace and rise in glory”. And with prayer like this: With grateful hearts for their life here, their love and gifts and many good memories, we commend them to the infinite mercy and goodness of God knowing ‘that they are held by the everlasting arms of God Our Father’ (Deuteronomy 33:27). Note also Romans 8:38-39, that ‘nothing but nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ our Lord’.

Our understanding of all this is still partial and incomplete. And always pray in the way that you see it and that helps you most. God understands even if we don’t, and what matters is that we hold on to our core faith in the glorious, final, full resurrection in the life of the world to come; and leave the hows and the whens to God. We should always praise God and pray for our loved ones in the ways described or similar. To forget them would almost be a crime against love.

One day in God’s good time and merciful purpose when our human life here is ended, you and I will indeed be taken to our eternal home by Jesus (1 Thessalonians 4:14). God will clothe us with the fullness of the glorious resurrection body. We will truly share in the ecstatic mystery of the final glorious return of Christ our King. We shall see our beloved Lord face to face in joy forever (1 John 3:2, again). We will share eternal joy too with countless Angels and Saints (Hebrews 12:22-24; etc) and with our loved ones already there. In the next and final article I will try to sum up the whole Nicene Creed.

In praise of God the good Creator and all loving Redeemer, and for the precious gifts of life and faith, and also for this Creed, I would like to close with this Litany of Praise to Jesus:

For his holy Incarnation and victorious Cross:    Blessed be Jesus our Lord and God.
For his triumphant Resurrection and glorious Ascension:  Blessed be Jesus.
For the gift of his Spirit and the holy catholic Church: Blessed be Jesus.
For the gifts of grace in Word, Sacrament and Christian Fellowship:  Blessed be Jesus.
For the triumphs of his Gospel, the lives of his Saints, and yours and mine: Blessed be Jesus.
For joy or for sorrow, in life and in death: Blessed be Jesus.
For the sure hope of eternal glory with him and with each other: Blessed be Jesus.
And from now until the end of the ages:   Blessed be Jesus.
Alleluia. Amen.

George Abell