Summing Up (Exploring the Nicene Creed)

I want first to give an estimation of the importance of this Creed both for the Church as a whole and for each of us personally; then to mention briefly other Christian Creeds, Confessions of Faith, Articles of Religion, and such like. Then I shall close with a very different style of creed which I think ‘earths’ our glorious Nicean Faith in our present day world with its huge needs, despairs and challenges. It’s called “A Creed of Hope”.

For about 1700 years the Nicene Creed has been the official bedrock or public Confession of Faith of almost all Christians. Its phrases have a depth of beauty, clarity and meaning that has enabled it to stand the test of time, and to weather many turbulent days and eras in the Church’s history. It was, and so still is, a truly ecumenical creed.

As I have explained earlier it was first promulgated by leaders from all local Churches across the whole of the Christian world. So in a true sense it is still the basic essential Creed of all Christian Communions today, whether Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, Anglican or whatever. It is therefore a Creed of Unity which holds us together and unites us whatever our relatively small differences on some aspects of our faith and practise might be.

In my very first article I wrote: “… standing and proudly but humbly declaring that Creed with others is immensely important and helpful, both individually, and as a communion and fellowship of believers. It undergirds our personal faith. It reassures us when necessary. It bonds us together in Christ as Church and family, and above all it gives glory to our God”. In other words just as our spine and bone structure supports and undergirds our whole body, so this Creed is like the spine of our faith. Like the Lord’s Prayer it is something we could do well to know by heart.

Through 1700 years of Christian history there have been many other Creeds and Confessions of faith. The shorter “Apostles Creed” as it is called is even older than this one and is still used at Anglican Services, Confirmations etc. You can find it in the Book of Common Prayer or Common Worship.

Another creed compiled some years after the Nicene Creed is called the “Creed of St Athanasius”. It was formulated to express in depth and detail the nature and harmony of the Persons of the Trinity. That can also be found in the Book of Common Prayer after Evening Prayer. At the time of the 16th Century Reformation many splits from the Roman Church sadly took place (arising from the errors, wrongful teachings and practises of the later middle ages).

New national or regional Churches then formulated not a new basic essential creed but what were called Articles or Confessions of Faith, setting out the theological and ecclesiastical position of each Church with its understanding of the Christian Faith.

At this time the Church of England adopted what was called “The Thirty Nine Articles of Religion”, and they can usually be found as an appendix to the Book of Common Prayer. Such articles are not of the same standing or importance as the catholic or universal creeds like that of Nicea. They dealt in part with controversial issues of the time; and also made clarification of other aspects of our faith. Though they do have value still, many of those 16th century issues have largely been resolved. And thankfully nowadays there is far more common understanding and practice of our holy faith on the part of most Christian Churches.

A useful exercise is to sit down and compile one’s own personal creed setting out how we as individuals see our faith, what it means to us, and how we try to live it. After all the Creeds are not just cold cerebral academic statements but living expressions of living people living out the Christian life. Some time back one of our Alpha Courses here as a group compiled how it saw its creed. They came up with a very worthy document, very Christ centred, heartfelt, and certainly challenging. I will close now with a very modern style of creed. Read it and use it, hopefully I pray as your personal creed too.

A Creed of Hope

  • I believe in God, the God of all truth, the God whose word is life. I believe in God who accompanies me along every step of my path on this earth; many times walking behind me, watching me and suffering with my mistakes; at other times walking beside me, talking to me, and teaching me; and at other times again, walking ahead of me, guiding and marking my pace.
  • I believe in the God of flesh and blood, Jesus Christ; the God who lived in my skin and tried on my shoes; the God who walked in my ways, and knows of lights and shadows. The God who ate and starved, who had a home, and suffered loneliness; who was praised and condemned, kissed and spat on, loved and hated. The God who went to parties and funerals; the God who laughed and cried, and shed his blood for me on a cruel Cross.
  • I believe in the God who is still attentive today; who looks at the world and sees the hatred that segregates, divides, sets people aside, hurts and kills; who sees the bullets piercing the flesh, and the blood of innocent people flowing on the earth; who sees the hand that dips into another’s pocket, stealing what somebody needs to eat.
  • I believe in the God who sees the dirty rivers, and the dead fish; the toxic substances destroying the earth, and piercing the sky; who sees the future mortgaged, and man’s debt growing. I believe in God who sees all this … and keeps on crying.
  • But I also believe in the God who sees a mother giving birth, a life born from pain; who sees two children playing; who sees a seed growing, and a flower blooming out of the debris, a new beginning; who sees three crazy women clamouring for justice, an illusion that doesn’t die; who sees the sun rising every morning, a time of opportunities. I believe in a God who sees all this … and laughs, because in spite of it all, there is hope

George Abell